Proof of a growing industry

Thursday, April 11, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

gun store assault weaponsIt's a trade some Americans want to get rid of, but the firearms industry continues to bring in tax revenue and create jobs – and is showing astounding growth.

The total economic impact of the firearms and ammunition industry in the United States increased from $19.1 billion in 2008 to $52.1 billion in 2018.

"That's a 171-percent increase," says Mark Oliva of National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), an organization that just released a report on the economic impact of the firearms industry.

"Our jobs that are related to our industry rose from 166,000 in 2008 to 312,000 today," he adds, noting that that's an increase of 88 percent.

"The average pay for these jobs is about $50,000 with wages and benefits," he continues. "They're good, steady jobs and they're providing for families in these states."

Wage growth in the industry, over the same time period, showed a 147-percent increase ($6.4 billion to $15.7 billion).

According to NSSF, the states that have the highest economic output when it comes to firearms and ammunition were Texas, California, Illinois, Minnesota, Florida, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Ohio.

The top ten states with jobs related to firearms were Texas, California, Florida, Illinois, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Ohio, North Carolina, Missouri, and Georgia.

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