Danhof: Corporation blocked me at shareholder meet

Wednesday, April 25, 2018
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

John Candy security guardAn investor-activist wants the Securities and Exchange Commission to take action against a corporation that refused to allow him to attend a shareholders meeting.  

Justin Danhof of the conservative National Center for Public Policy Research criss-crosses the U.S. to attend shareholder meetings, where he confronts liberal executives over their left-wing policies. 

When he traveled April 24 to the VF Corporation shareholder meeting in North Carolina, Danhof says he was told he was not an investor and, after a discussion with the assistant general counsel, was told he could go in but he could not ask a question.

When he tried to go in on his own accord, Danhof says security guards stood in the way.

VF Corporation is one of the world's largest apparel, and footwear companies with control of brands including Vans, The North Face, Timberland, Wrangler, and Lee.

One hint of its liberal views is a "perfect score" on the Corporate Equalty Index performed by the Human Rights Campaign, a powerful homosexual-rights lobbying group. 

VF's senior director of global inclusion and diversity told HRC that the corporation is on a "journey" to build one of the most "inclusive work environments in the world."

According to Danhof, however, the corporation isn't interested in questions that don't please the company's executives.  

Danhof, Justin (Nat'l Ctr for Public Policy Research)"I just wanted to ask a shareholder question that has to do with some of the company's statements regarding property rights, the federal government takeover of certain large areas of property," Danhof tells OneNewsNow.

Danhof and National Center made headlines in March when Disney CEO Bob Iger, confronted by Danhof, disclosed that "The View" co-host Joy Behar had apologized to Vice President Mike Pence for her comments about Christians. 

According to Danhof, he showed paperwork to prove he was a VF investor and therefore had the right to be present at the shareholder meeting.

"It was clear that they knew who I was," he now says, "and they didn't want me to ask any questions that would be critical of the company, and critical of the board or the chairman or the CEO."

Danhof tells OneNewsNow he has contacted the Securities and Exchange Commission over the incident, asking for VF Corporation to be punished

OneNewsNow asked VF Corporation for comment but did not receive a response by press time.

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