Boeing-Iran deal called dangerous

Wednesday, December 14, 2016
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Iranian nuclear reactorEven though Iran maintains that it has finalized a deal with American aircraft manufacturer Boeing, critics remain quite skeptical about the agreement.

The multi-billion dollar deal would provide new commercial airplanes to Iran.

The agreement is permitted under the international deal involving Iran's nuclear research, and while the Obama administration and its supporters insist that there is nothing to worry about, individuals, think tanks and special interest groups disagree.

"It's a huge problem," Independent Women’s Forum (IWF) foreign policy fellow Claudia Rosett insisted. "This is part of a bigger scene in which Iran – especially before President-elect Trump takes office –  is moving as fast as it can to entrench itself in every possible way in the world economy."

Rosett tells OneNewsNow that Iran is still the world's leading state-sponsor of terrorism.

"The commercial aircraft that it has used (among other things) to shuttle back and forth to Syria, bringing personnel, weapons and so on, which have been part of the horrible carnage there in which something like half a million people have now died," Rosett continued.

In a press release, Boeing stated that it coordinated closely with the U.S. government throughout the process leading up to the sale. The manufacturer continues to follow all license requirements as it moves forward.

"The agreement will support tens of thousands of U.S. jobs directly associated with production and delivery of the planes, and nearly 100,000 U.S. jobs in the U.S. aerospace value stream for the full course of deliveries," Boeing added in its statement.

"When Iran does a big deal with an American company like this, what you're inviting is that the company becomes an advocate for Iran – for maintaining nice relations, for trying to treat them well," Rosett warned. "If the main purpose of dealing with terror-linked or despotic states is to generate jobs in America, then let's sell aircraft to the North Koreans."

The first airplanes under the U.S.-Iran agreement are scheduled for delivery in 2018.

Consider Supporting Us?

The staff at Onenewsnow.com strives daily to bring you news from a biblical perspective. If you benefit from this platform and want others to know about it please consider a generous gift today.

MAKE A DONATION

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Would you prefer that Attorney General Jeff Sessions uphold the laws of the United States – or the laws of the United Methodist Church?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Trump tells GOP to 'stop wasting their time' on immigration
Supreme Court adopts new rules for cellphone tracking
UK split by Brexit divide 2 years after vote to leave EU
Another U.S. worker confirmed hurt by mystery Cuba incidents
2 Koreas meet to arrange reunions of war-split families
Charles Krauthammer, prominent conservative voice, has died
Many Egyptian Christians feel left out of World Cup
Bank robbery suspect gives ID, easily tracked by police

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Women-only tech scholarships, ‘Man Tax’ violate California discrimination laws: lawsuit
Boy, 13, charged with felony for recording meeting with principal
Open letter to school boards everywhere: Stop renaming your schools after Obama
Another massive media screw up: Viral photo used to prove family separation horror was of a girl who wasn't actually separated
When PC comes back to bite you

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Pros and cons of Uber and Lyft fingerprint checks in NYC

car dealership lotWith the coming of the New Year, fingerprint background checks could be required for Uber and Lyft in upstate New York, where arguments for and against the idea have been voiced.