Shining a light on GE hypocrisy

Friday, April 29, 2016
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

GE logoGeneral Electric investors have been made aware of allegations the corporate giant engages in "religious liberty hypocrisy."

Justin Danhof of the National Center for Public Policy Research went to a GE shareholders meeting April 27 in Jacksonville, Florida, where he raised concerns after GE opposed religious freedom laws in Indiana and other states.

While critics including GE claim that religious freedom laws discriminate against homosexuals, Danhof says such laws simply require the government to explain why a person's religious beliefs should bow to a local ordinance or a state law. 

Under such laws, he says, the government must go to court to prove a "compelling interest" in overruling a person's personal religious beliefs, which the Indiana legislation - villified by activists and the media - required. 

Danhof, Justin (Nat'l Ctr for Public Policy Research)Based on this, Danhof asked GE investors to "express support for the company's 'zero tolerance' on discrimination," which would include operating in countries where homosexuality is a crime punishable by death.

"As I said to the shareholders, If you want to see discrimination against homosexuals, don't look to Indianapolis, look to Riyadh and Tehran, where General Electric does business," Danhof tells OneNewsNow. 

GE is heavily involved in Iran, in fact, where homosexuals can be arrested and jailed. 

The head of GE's oil-and-gas business visited Tehran "to explore business opportunities there," The Wall Street Journal reported in a February story.

GE is "taking another look at the country" after sanctions were lifted, the story explained. 

Even though Danhof's proposal was not approved, he says he was satisfied to educate investors on the corporation's hypocrisy. 

General Electric did not immediately respond to OneNewsNow for comment.

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