Senate approves successor to Rick Perry as energy secretary

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (December 2, 2019) — President Donald Trump’s pick to succeed Rick Perry as energy secretary won easy Senate confirmation Monday, despite a Democratic senator’s objections that the nominee hadn’t fully answered questions related to the Trump impeachment investigation.

Several other Democrats joined Republicans in approving Deputy Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette’s promotion, 70-15.

Confirmation of Brouillette, who’d been responsible for day-to-day operations at the Energy Department for two years under Perry, came a day after Perry’s resignation became effective.

Perry has said his departure had nothing to do with his energy work in Ukraine for the Trump administration and that he was focused on longstanding U.S. policy to lessen that country’s dependence on Russia for fuel. A House impeachment panel is scrutinizing Trump’s push for Ukraine to investigate a company employing a son of rival Joe Biden.

Brouillette, a veteran in state and federal energy regulatory matters, easily won bipartisan support since Trump nominated him Nov. 7. He told a Senate committee hearing last month he knew nothing about any of the Ukraine conversations under scrutiny.

However, Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon accused Brouillette of failing to detail what he knows about Perry’s meetings with natural gas officials and others in Ukraine. Wyden told the Senate on Monday that Brouillette was waging a “full-court stonewall.”

Another Democrat, Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, took the floor to call Brouillette a “good man.”

“He has been forthcoming. He has not held anything back,” Manchin said.

Perry, a former Texas governor, used his job in part to promote U.S. oil and gas overseas, while also stressing the value of the national research labs and other cutting-edge work overseen by the Energy Department. Republican senators in Brouillette’s committee confirmation hearing made clear they expected him to keep using the agency to advocate for U.S. fossil fuels, although Brouillette’s first remarks at the hearing stressed the department’s research on supercomputers and other scientific efforts.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What was the most revealing revelation from the Senate hearing on the inspector general’s report? (Choose up to two)

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

House panel presses toward historic Trump impeachment vote
  Crash shines light on immigrants in Christmas tree workforce
UK exit poll suggests majority for Johnson's Conservatives
10 ex-NFL players charged with defrauding healthcare program
  US water chief praises Colorado River deal, sees challenges
Official: Jersey City attack was 'fueled' by anti-Semitism
US puts hold on new foreign military students

LATEST FROM THE WEB

House panel to hold key impeachment vote, after day of all-out sparring and intrigue
Cory Booker didn't qualify for the next Dem debate, but still says he has a 'path to victory'
Dems deliver how-to lesson in 'quid pro quo' ... on guns
Impeachment markup heats up as Nadler says 'we cannot rely on an election' to oust Trump
Ben Sasse causes liberal implosion on social media after he admits FISA abuse accusations were true

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
US water chief praises Colorado River deal, sees challenges

LAS VEGAS (December 12, 20149) — States in the U.S. West that have agreed to begin taking less water next month from the drought-stricken Colorado River got praise and a push for more action Thursday from the nation’s top water official.