Democrats release their impeachment report

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (December 3, 2019) — House Democrats have released their impeachment report which repeats the allegations they have been making against President Trump and their charge that he abused his power in dealings with Ukraine.

Horowitz

"The impeachment inquiry [by the House Intelligence Committee] denied the president the rights that a common criminal has in court to be represented. It was like Star Chamber proceedings; much like the Inquisition."

"[The 2020] election will decide the fate of this country. Of course, the Democrats can go ahead and impeach – Republicans made that mistake with [Bill] Clinton, and Clinton perjured himself before a grand jury. But the American people … want their presidents voted in and voted out. There's 63-million people who voted for Trump who are still pretty loyal to him."

David Horowitz, founder
David Horowitz Freedom Center
(in an interview with OneNewsNow.com)

The 300-page report from Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee repeats the charge that President Trump threatened to withold aid to Ukraine if the government there didn't investigate whether former Vice President Joe Biden used his office to get his son a high paying position on the board of a Ukraine energy company. Trump and his Republican allies have completely denied the allegation.

In a statement, White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham said “Chairman Schiff and the Democrats utterly failed to produce any evidence of wrongdoing by President Trump.” She said the report "reads like the ramblings of a basement blogger straining to prove something when there is evidence of nothing.”

Ahead of the release, Republicans defended the president in a rebuttal claiming Trump never intended to pressure Ukraine when he asked for the investigation. They say the military aid the white House was withholding was not being used as leverage, as Democrats claim, and besides the $400 million was ultimately released.

Trump at the opening of a NATO leaders' meeting in London on Tuesday criticized the impeachment push as “unpatriotic" and “a bad thing for our country."

Democrats once hoped to sway Republicans to consider Trump's removal, but they are now facing the prospect of an ever-hardening partisan split over the swift-moving proceedings on impeaching the president.

Recent polls have also indicated that the majority of Americans feel the proceedings are a waste of time and not something worthy of great priority for lawmakers.

For Republicans offering an early rebuttal ahead of the report’s public release, the proceedings are simply a “hoax,” with Trump insisting he did nothing wrong and his GOP allies in line behind him. Trump tweeted his daily complaints about it all and then added a suggestive, if impractical, question: “Can we go to Supreme Court to stop?”

Trump criticized the House for pushing forward with the proceedings while he was overseas, a breach of political decorum that traditionally leaves partisan differences at the water’s edge.

He predicted Republicans would actually benefit from the impeachment effort against him.

For the Democrats, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi faces a critical moment of her leadership as she steers the process ahead after resisting the impeachment inquiry through the summer, warning at the time that it was too divisive for the country and required bipartisan support.

“They are trying to impeach President Trump because some unelected bureaucrats chafed at an elected President’s 'outside the beltway' approach to diplomacy,” according to the report from Republican Reps. Devin Nunes of California, Jim Jordan of Ohio and Michael McCaul of Texas.

 

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