Biden ignores border crisis...announces billions more spending

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (April 28, 2021) — President Joe Biden used his first address to a joint session of Congress on Wednesday night to celebrate the billions of dollars that his administration has already spent in the name of COVID relief and announced even more big government programs.

JoeBiden 100 days joint sessionAs part of the new spending plans, Biden laid out a sweeping proposal for universal preschool, two years of free community college, $225 billion for child care and monthly payments of at least $250 to parents. His plan will cost almost $2 trillion and declared that that economic growth will best come from taxing the rich to help the middle class and the poor.

In his first three months in office, Biden has signed a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill — passed without a single GOP vote — and has shepherded direct payments of $1,400 per person to more than 160 million households.


South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott has used the Republican response to President Joe Biden’s address to Congress to vow that “America is not a racist country.” (Read more...)


Biden, as he has done in the past, also declared his unbridled support for unions and repeated his call for a $15 minimum wage. He has already announced that all federal contract employees going forward must be paid a minimum of $15 an hour

Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday, “President Biden ran as a moderate, but I’m hard pressed to think of anything at all that he’s done so far that would indicate some degree of moderation."

Biden also used the speech to call for passage of the Equality Act, which gives special protection to homosexuals and transsexuals; and he also wants more restrictions on who can own guns as well as what kind of weapons Americans can purchase.

Biden also declared that Congress should pass H.R. 1, a sweeping piece of legislation that would give the federal government control over all voting standards across the country -- taking that control away from state governments.

He also condemned the violence at Capitol Hill on January 6 but said nothing about the violence that has wreaked havoc in many American cities in connection with the anti-police movement.

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