Aetna pullout shows Obamacare on life support

Associated Press

(May 11, 2017) - While Republicans rewrite the Affordable Care Act in Washington, the immediate future of the law has grown hazier with the nation's third-largest health insurer saying that it will completely divorce itself from state-based insurance exchanges.

Aetna says it won't sell individual coverage in Nebraska and Delaware next year after projecting a $200 million loss this year. The insurer had already pulled out of several states after losing about $450 million in 2016.

The exchanges are a pillar of the federal law because they allow millions of people to buy coverage with help from income-based tax credits. But insurers like Humana, and now Aetna, have been fleeing that market. Others like the Blue Cross-Blue Shield carrier Anthem say they are wary of returning without guarantees of at least one key financial support.

Every exchange had at least one insurer offering coverage for 2017, but a growing number were down to only one. Insurance experts expect holes to develop in 2018 with the coverage growing so thin. Customers may be able to find individual insurance coverage off the exchanges, but those marketplaces offer the only way for people to get tax credits to help pay the premium.

About 12 million people bought coverage through the exchanges for this year. Most used tax credits to help buy coverage.

Among the states in trouble for next year is Iowa. Aside from Aetna, Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield also said it will leave that state's individual market after only a year on it. Another insurer, Medica, said earlier this month that its "ability to stay in the Iowa insurance market in any capacity is in question at this point."

Earlier this year, Humana's decision to leave the exchanges temporarily left 16 Tennessee counties with no on-exchange coverage options for 2018. But BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee recently said it would fill that void.

Insurers are in the middle of figuring out their prices and coverage plans for 2018. The departure of competitors from a market could play a role in their decisions because that may swamp them with a wave of new customers, some of whom likely have expensive medical conditions. The ACA prevents insurers from rejecting patients based on their health.

"All it takes is one insurance company to exit, and that can create panic for other insurers and they pull out too," said Cynthia Cox, a health insurance expert for the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation, which studies health care. "Insurers don't want to be the last one holding the bag."

But she also noted that an insurer doesn't have to worry as much about pricing too high and losing business if it has no competitors in a market.

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

If you could say just one thing to Target's corporate executives…

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Warning of imminent attack, Britain raises threat level
3 more arrests in Manchester; London tourist sites protected
'We can use peace': Trump and Pope Francis meet
Trump budget keeps campaign pledges
Trump's food stamp cuts face hard sell in Congress

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Citing disparities, Dem wants to sink $100B into dilapidated public schools
College Republicans cleared of wrongdoing for highlighting black abortion rate, transgender disorder
Europe’s denial of Islamic terrorism threat perplexes security specialists
Manchester isn’t the first time jihadists have slaughtered children
How government schools breed strife

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Trump's food stamp cuts face hard sell in Congress

WASHINGTON (May 24, 2017) — President Donald Trump's proposal to slash food stamps by a third will be a hard sell in Congress, even as Republicans have tried repeatedly to scale back the program's $70 billion annual cost.