Iranian leader spews more hatred against Israel

Associated Press

TEHRAN, Iran (May 22, 2020) — Iran's supreme leader on Friday called Israel a “cancerous tumor” that “will undoubtedly be uprooted and destroyed” in an annual speech in support of the Palestinians, renewing threats against Iran's Mideast enemy.

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's speech marked a subdued Quds Day for Iran, which typically sees government-encouraged mass demonstrations in Tehran and elsewhere in the Islamic Republic, as well as Iranian-allied nations. “Al-Quds” is the Arabic name for Jerusalem.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Iran largely asked demonstrators to stay home.

Khamenei spoke to the nation in a 30-minute speech aired on state television, a rare address by the supreme leader as other officials in the past gave the keynote speech. He repeatedly referred to Israel as a “cancer” or “tumor” during the speech, criticizing the U.S. and the West for equipping it with “various kinds of military and non-military tools of power, even with atomic weapons.”

“The Zionist regime is a deadly, cancerous growth and a detriment to this region,” Khamenei said. “It will undoubtedly be uprooted and destroyed.”

Iran under the U.S.-allied Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi had relations with Israel. After the 1979 Islamic Revolution, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini ordered the first Quds Day be held on the last Friday of the holy Muslim fasting month of Ramadan to criticize Israel. The late Palestinian Liberation Organization leader Yasser Arafat was among the first people invited to Iran after the revolution.

Today, Iran and Israel remain enemies and Israel is believed to be behind airstrikes targeting Iranian forces in Syria. Iran meanwhile supports the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah.

Khamenei also compared Israel to the coronavirus during the speech, while saying his anti-Israeli views were not anti-Semitic.

However, in the days running up to Friday, his office released a cartoon graphic showing smiling Iranian-backed forces, Arabs and two Orthodox Jews in Jerusalem under a headline that included the phrase “the final solution.” Nazi Germany used the phrase “final solution” to describe its plan for the Holocaust, in which its forces killed 6 million Jews in World War II.

 

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Do you agree the virus pandemic has impacted our constitutional rights?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Memorial Day weekend draws crowds and triggers warnings
Slowly, surely, US houses of worship emerge from lockdown
White House imposes coronavirus travel ban on Brazil
Israel’s Netanyahu attacks justice system as trial begins
Desperate Indian girl bikes 745 miles home with disabled dad
Hong Kong police fire tear gas, water cannon at protesters
Taliban, Ghani declare three-day cease fire for Eid holiday

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Sen. Rick Scott: Bill of Rights allows Americans to worship at church service, no matter what gov't leaders say
Will Trump order sanctions on China's president for Hong Kong crackdown?
Beto O’Rourke mocks Texas governor’s reopening message – then hears back from Crenshaw, Cruz
Opinion — Newt Gingrich: On Memorial Day, we have a duty to honor Americans who died defending our country
Trump to attend Wednesday's NASA astronaut launch in Florida

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Slowly, surely, US houses of worship emerge from lockdown

(May 24, 2020) — For the first time in two months, there was clapping, singing and fellowship inside Stithton Baptist Church in Radcliff, Kentucky, as members of the congregation returned to the sanctuary for Sunday morning services. There also were masks, hand sanitizer and social distancing.