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Legal-Courts

Reason to challenge LSU's "Free Speech Alley"

Bob Kellogg   (OneNewsNow.com) Friday, November 09, 2012

ADF has filed a lawsuit on behalf of a student in Louisiana whose free-speech rights were restricted during a pro-life event on campus.

When the Louisiana State University (LSU) student wanted to distribute literature during the Pro-Life Day of Silent Solidarity, she was told she could only do so in the school's "Free Speech Alley." Matt Sharp of the Alliance Defending Freedom explains what that is.

Sharp, Matt (ADF)"This strip of concrete -- about 1,000 square feet, about 80 feet long -- is the designated location for free speech on campus, the only place anywhere out of a 650-acre campus that students can distribute literature," he tells OneNewsNow.

"When our client went to request to be able to do so, she was told You can hand it out in Free Speech Alley and nowhere else."

ADF has written to LSU officials, hoping the school will follow the examples of others that have eliminated these types of policies.

"There [have] been several court cases [like this]," Sharp notes. "In fact, one just earlier this year up in the University of Cincinnati that had a very similar restriction, and the court there held it unconstitutional."

The ADF attorney adds that the university requiring students to register in order to reserve space in the Free Speech Alley is also unconstitutional.

LSU recently came under fire for editing out the crosses painted on the chests of the school's famous "Painted Posse." Officials then went a step further and declared the school a "religious symbol-free zone."

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