Lawsuit to follow unconstitutional arrest?

Friday, March 9, 2012
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)
Jackson, Mississippi, might face a federal lawsuit over the way it recently handled a group of pro-life demonstrators at Murrah High School.

Six members of Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust, a group composed of high school and college age men and women, were conducting the demonstration on a public sidewalk at the school. Allison Aranda of the Life Legal Defense Foundation (LLDF) tells OneNewsNow code enforcement officers arrested Kristina Garza and Brianna Baxter, even though the sidewalk is for public use. Allison Aranda (LLDF)"Actually, at the same time that all of this was happening, several other people in the community were utilizing the public sidewalk -- walking by; some people were jogging," she explains. "There's a jogging trail that goes around the school that's open to the public. There [are] basketball courts that are open to the public. So the nature of the sidewalk is that it is open to the public for public use." But as Aranda notes, it seems that does not apply to pro-lifers.

Some students chatted with the demonstrators and accepted literature. The two girls who were arrested spent the night in jail and were released on personal recognizance on charges that Aranda says are patently unconstitutional. She may file suit as she seeks to have those charges dismissed.

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