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Clergy group: Rulings should light a fire under the church, under pastors

Charlie Butts   (OneNewsNow.com) Thursday, June 27, 2013

In the wake of yesterday's Supreme Court decisions on California's Proposition 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act, pastors are being challenged to pick up the banner and continue to fight for traditional, biblical marriage.

The court sent Prop. 8 back to state courts saying supporters of the constitutional amendment defining marriage as one man and one woman do not have legal standing. In a separate ruling on Wednesday, DOMA - in part - was declared unconstitutional. ( See earlier article) Both were 5-4 decisions.

Owens, William (CAAP)

Rev. William Owens, president of the Coalition of African-American Pastors, fears the rulings will only accelerate the erosion he sees in communities that are "already plagued with problems" and he believes is occurring in society in general.

"It appears that society, the president, [and] the court did not think about the children and history," he tells OneNewsNow. "No society has sustained itself when they started this type of downward moral path."

Owens goes on to say that people of faith should no longer slumber on the issue. "The church didn't step up to bat on this," he states. "It is a wakeup call - and the people have not been awakened the way they're going to be awakened when they see the consequences of this type of ruling."

While the high court in its rulings did not legalize homosexual "marriage," it also did not define marriage as between a man and a woman. Owens says traditional marriage needs to be protected, and that his organization is going to become more aggressive - especially in challenging pastors.

Peters, Thomas (NOM)

More reaction ...

A traditional marriage group says all isn't lost in light of Wednesday's Supreme Court decisions sending Prop. 8 back to the courts and declaring part of DOMA unconstitutional.

Staver: Expect more litigation

Staver, Mat (Liberty Counsel)Legal analysts such as Mat Staver at Liberty Counsel believe the Supreme Court's decision striking down part of the Defense of Marriage Act as unconstitutional will mean lawyers on both sides of the issue will be headed back to court.

"I think the decision by the federal Supreme Court with regards to DOMA is going to cause a lot of litigation in states, for example, that already affirm marriage as one man and one woman," he tells OneNewsNow. "When someone comes to that state and has a same-sex marriage from another state, that's going to cause litigation there.

"I think there's going to be direct attacks against the other constitutional marriage amendments using this particular decision."

Staver says the floodgates have been opened, but encourages people who believe in moral values to take a stand. He adds that the only way the court decision becomes legitimate is if people accept it and do not fight against it.

"First of all, I think we have to put away the white flags," says National Organization for Marriage spokesman Thomas Peters. "You know, we had two narrow Supreme Court decisions handed down. They're both wrong, but they're not disastrous for us. There's a clear path forward in Congress and the states and in the hearts and minds of our neighbors on protecting the true definition of marriage."

Thomas says homosexual rights activists wanted a redefinition of marriage from the court but didn't get it.

And while the two Supreme Court decisions left little room for celebration for either side of the marriage argument, Liberty Counsel founder Mat Staver tells OneNewsNow that he found something disturbing in the majority opinion:

"Justice [Anthony] Kennedy essentially said that anyone who believes in marriage as one man and one woman - an institution that predates, in fact, religion and all civil authorities, that transcends time and history and space and culture and ethnicities - that anyone who believes in that institution as one man and one woman has to be a bigot, has to be someone who is mean-spirited, is demeaning, and is frankly an enemy of humanity."

Staver considers that insulting to all Americans and to states that have passed constitutional marriage amendments. He believes the decision will lead to more court challenges in the states.


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